Birds of Oklahoma Winter

 

Oklahoma with its mild winter is host to many birds. The meadowlark and the cardinals keep busy and wait out spring along with nuthatches and the tiny tufted titmouse. The meadowlark with its yellow chest and belly and its stripes and choir scarf of jet black is my favorite of all the birds.

The winters are not hard or long here on the Oklahoma plains. With the brownheaded cowbirds and the redwinged blackbirds, the blue jay, a multitude of sparrows, doves, and the indomitable crow we wait together. We hope for a bit of snow and sometimes have ice instead which wreaks havoc on the trees and power lines. The birds don’t mind as long as I fill the feeders!

Here’s my spring poem about the meadowlark. I hope you enjoy it!

Meadowlark

By Elece Hollis

Dandelions in the grass

Smiling sweetly as I pass

Nodding heads of yellow fluff

You tell me I don’t smile enough?

 

Meadowlark perched on the fence

Would you sing for fifty cents?

“I only sing for free,” said he,

“For life is sweet and good to me.”

 

Iris fronds like swords of green

Purple blossoms in between,

You say I’m walking much too fast?

How many wonders I walk past!

 

Oak tree towering overhead

Rooted in a lily bed

My vision is too small you think?

I do not know how deep roots sink?

 

Snow white clouds up in the blue

You tell me what I fear is true.

I hurry, scurry, stop too rarely

Only know my world too sparely!

 

Remind me to come out of self

To take my soul down from the shelf,

To find the Lark’s own cause to sing.

Yes, life is good and sweet in spring.

 

 

Elece Hollis is a mother to seven and grandmother to 24. She lives in Oklahoma where she is retired from homeschooling  and writes full time. Elece likes to paint, write poetry, and is a photographer who enjoys shooting nature, especially flowers. She helps her husband on their 80 acre farm where they grow pecans and raise beef cattle. She is currently working on a book of prayers and a book of poetry.

 

Life with Mama (http://bit.ly/2LIFEMAMA)

What’s Good About Home (http://bit.ly/2MYHOME)

Heart of Spring (http://bit.ly/TeachSprg1)

 

 

Bright Song

 Beauty is God’s handwriting––a wayside sacrament. 
Welcome it in every fair face, in every fair sky, in every fair flower, 
and thank God for it as a cup of blessing. 
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Bright Song
By Elece hollis
 
Beside the steam I found them 
Sunlit iris wild.
I stopped and walked among them with
 Wonder of a child.
 
I sat down and I listened
And I began to hear
Music from the forest, the ocean,
Coming near.
 
I think I heard a mountain 
Singing a sweet air
A melody, a tune, a hymn, a ballad 
I could share.
 
So I joined in the singing, 
The serenade of light;
An anthem, a soft lullaby, a sonnet,
Chorus bright.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Time


You’re a man, you’ve seen the world––
The beauty and the wonder and the power, 
The shape of things, their colors, lights and shades, 
Changes, surprises–– And God made it all!
Robert Browning

Time
By Elece Hollis

Time for vases of daffodils on the windowsill.
Time for filling the hummingbird feeders.
Time for sunny warmer days and thunder-stormy evenings.
Time for treefrogs singing after rain.
Time for listening for the returning song of the scissortail.
Time for goldfinches bright yellow in the dandelion patches.
Time to start mowing grass.
Time for azaleas blooming in the park.
Time for bumblebees investigating the first roses.
Time to eat asparagus for supper.
Time for watching the sunset from the porch swing.
Time for wonder. Time for renewal.
Time for dogwood.

Left Behind

“Every moment of this strange and lovely life from dawn to dusk is a miracle. 

Somewhere, always, a rose is opening its petals to the dawn. 

Somewhere, always, a flower is fading in the dusk.” 

 Beverly Nichols


Left Behind
by Elece Hollis
I love to find the spaces where the flowers bloom and grow,
Places where once frame houses stood … abandoned long ago.
I love to see the trees strong standing like sentinels on the land;
To think of the generations these farms and orchards spanned.
I love to think in years gone by—sweet on a springtime day,
Long before the family changed and faded soft away,
A housewife knelt with flower bulbs, a garden trowel in her hand,
Turned back the dirt and snugged each bulb like a promise to the land.
She watched them sprout each springtime—watched them bloom in time;
She knew they’d make the heart glad … like God’s poetry and rhyme.
Pink hyacinths, dancing iris, bright sunny daffodils,
Come suddenly through the brown loam of winter’s dreary chills.
Through many years of happiness, perhaps a few of woe,
Those flowers sprout back up again when soft spring breezes blow.
They push up through life’s seasons. They speak of days gone by,
Of births, of deaths, marriages, moves—changes the blossoms belie.
One day the house stood empty, one day the roof would fall,
But those flowers would come for decades—legacies outlasting all.
When houses and barns decay and fall, and fences totter and lean
The soil reclaims its expanses, but time winks his eye at these.
A good man leaves an inheritance for his Children’s children…
Proverbs 13:22

Helen Steiner Rice poetry with devotions by Elece Hollis

Come See!

Come See!
By Elece Hollis
Come see—come join in the song!
All earth sings praise to the Creator
Who has from time immemorial 
Raised His hand and created the seed,
The tree, the leaf, the bud, the flower
Anew each day—fresh and beautiful,
Bright and color-filled, light-kissed, and sweet-scented
Again and again—yet never has His paintbrush
Failed to make men and angels
Gasp and sigh in wonder
At His creations. 
 Come now—join in the song!
 If we be faithless, yet He remains faithful, because
 He cannot deny Himself.
2 Timothy 3:13
Summer and winter, and springtime and harvest,
Sun, moon, and stars in their courses above
Join with all nature in manifold witness,
To Thy great faithfulness, mercy and love.
Thomas O. Chisholm 1866–1960

The Family Bouquet

The Family Bouquet
Nothing beats the surprise of a florist at the door with a beautiful bouquet. My sweet husband sent me a bouquet last week and it was an especially wonderful one. It was made up of roses of several colors: pink, white, and some pinks with white edges. It had a spray of orange, some purple accents, red lilies and white ones trimmed with green. There were different sizes also. Some were full blossoms with satiny petals and some swirled and curled. Some were ruffled and some speckled. Each bloom unique.
The little ones came in clusters, several on a stem, like triplets or quintuplets. Some were perfectly shaped and symmetrical and others off-centered and just a bit uneven. Like the artist’s technique of off-setting, this makes them more interesting.
One big pink rose was the focal point and first catches your eye, but then the different sizes and colors cause your eye to run through the whole bouquet. Each flower added to the overall effect and appeal. The green leaves gave contrast and the little poppies couldn’t have been sweeter!
Families are God’s bouquets—all sizes, infants, toddlers, youngsters, teens, adults, and old folks—all shapes, sizes, personality types, all adding sounds to the music of a symphony—each adding shape and color to the overall composition.
I have seven children and each is as different as can be. Alone each may be considered lovely, but
together—each is a unique part of the whole, blended with parents and grandparents and some contrasts and sweetnesses—they become another of God’s masterpieces.
When God made Adam, it was the first of His creations which He did not think was complete. He said, “It is not good that the man should be alone.” (Gen 2:18) God knew that man needed a family.

In Psalms 68: 6, David said, “God sets the solitary in families.” He gathers single flowers into full bouquets. Beautiful!

©2014 Elece Hollis, author of Oh Baby!—a little handbook for new moms available on Amazon.com
http://amzn.to/1wBHa1t