Pecan Dreams

Pecan Dreams

I know for certain that dreams of pecans can keep you awake at night. Dreams of unshelled nuts in bushel baskets, cracked pecans in buckets, the smell of cinnamon rolls baking in the oven. In my dreams I can see the crispy sugary nut halves settled in the surface of a pie, taste the warm buttery sweetness of the custard underneath, see puddles of pralines drying on a sheet of waxed paper.

Then there are dreams southern antebellum like aisles of arching branches. These are the dreams I have of the pecan orchard. My husband has his own style of dream.

He dreams of trees laden with clusters of green nut hulls. He dreams of a rain of pecans falling under each tree, and he dreams of his work finding God’s timing and buckets and baskets and bags of clean beautiful product to carry to market.

He also has a dream wintery evenings of sitting in his recliner cracking a pan full of nuts for me whenever I want them for cooking up something wonderful. With a fire  crackling and bright in the woodstove, he enjoys the staccato cracks and pops of the nut shells.

A dream often takes much longer than you expect to show up at the front door. Some dreams take so much work and seem so far away as to be impossible. Some dreams with plenty of prayer and elbow grease come true!

 

Through Barbed Wire

 
What can you see through a barbed wire fence? No city streets, no glorious architecture, no people?
So what is there to see? If you never look, how much of life you miss. You might miss a wild pink rose bush stirred into the green windblown grasses.
A pasture fenced with barbed wire is a common sight in Oklahoma.
 Pasture roses climb old fences and gradually weigh them down. 
 
Foxglove beard Tongue blooming along the fenceline.
 
Prairie Plantain in the thick summer grasses with wild grape vine climbing the fence like a trellis.
Here is foxglove just beginning to blossom.
 
Coreopsis and coneflowers
 
The cattle graze across green ranch lands.
Trees slowly retake a pasture where no animals graze.
 
Clover and milk weed in the spring grass show through rusty barbed wire.
 
A green pasture full of plants.
 
A roofless stone shed tells of earlier landholders.
 
A curious donkey comes to look back at passersby.
 
A bird on the fence watching for flying snacks.
The Big Oklahoma Sky!

Through Barbed Wire

 
What can you see through a barbed wire fence? No city streets, no glorious architecture, no people?
So what is there to see? If you never look, how much of life you miss. You might miss a wild pink rose bush stirred into the green windblown grasses.
A pasture fenced with barbed wire is a common sight in Oklahoma.
 Pasture roses climb old fences and gradually weigh them down. 
 
Foxglove beard Tongue blooming along the fenceline.
 
Prairie Plantain in the thick summer grasses with wild grape vine climbing the fence like a trellis.
Here is foxglove just beginning to blossom.
 
Coreopsis and coneflowers
 
The cattle graze across green ranch lands.

Trees slowly retake a pasture where no animals graze.
 
Clover and milk weed in the spring grass show through rusty barbed wire.
 
A green pasture full of plants.
 
A roofless stone shed tells of earlier landholders.
 
A curious donkey comes to look back at passersby.
 
A bird on the fence watching for flying snacks.
The Big Oklahoma Sky!

Impressions of an Old Farm

The old farm house and detached garage and shed used to be painted yellow. Maybe this horse stable was once used as a chicken coop? I wondered about this window. What’s the point?

The horses still like the shed.
The old sink turned watering trough was mighty dry. The horses must have another water source.
Another dry sink trough.
Old wood fence posts and chain, barb wire and other fencing types.
An old can. Note the tree sprouting from the trunk.
Lilies in a flowerbed beside the old house.
Pasture grasses.

Old gas can by a barbed wire fence.
Pasture roses along a fence out back.
An old storm cellar, Wizard of Oz style. The door lifts up to one side 
and the main room has two covered air ports.
Dark, wet with sticks, roots, and old glass jars. I wouldn’t want to have to shelter here.
Ivy overtakes the old garage’s back. The tree trunks are 
covered too.

Impressions of an Old Farm

The old farm house and detached garage and shed used to be painted yellow. Maybe this horse stable was once used as a chicken coop? I wondered about this window. What’s the point?

The horses still like the shed.
The old sink turned watering trough was mighty dry. The horses must have another water source.
Another dry sink trough.
Old wood fence posts and chain, barb wire and other fencing types.
An old can. Note the tree sprouting from the trunk.
Lilies in a flowerbed beside the old house.
Pasture grasses.

Old gas can by a barbed wire fence.
Pasture roses along a fence out back.
An old storm cellar, Wizard of Oz style. The door lifts up to one side 
and the main room has two covered air ports.
Dark, wet with sticks, roots, and old glass jars. I wouldn’t want to have to shelter here.
Ivy overtakes the old garage’s back. The tree trunks are 
covered too.