Walk on a Fall Day


I didn’t expect to find these roses blooming on an October day.

Ron hung this swing for me years ago. I wanted the children to enjoy a rope swing like the one my daddy made for me when I was a girl.

This slate was moved from the back forty and makes a nice roadway to the pasture where Brenna’s horses graze and butterflies flutter through the last flowers- asters and coreopsis.

The sky fills with billowing clouds in the hot afternoon. 
There is plenty of humidity evaporating from last night’s rainfall.

 The boy’s treehouse looks small now. The tree is a giant!
 I think this is Virginia Creeper with black berries. Who knows? isn’t it beautiful. It is hanging in heavy swags from the limbs of one of the oak trees out back.

 Asparagus with orange berries.
 Figs still not ripe. I have harvested a few and eaten them. They are so sweet when they ripen to a dark purplish brown. The smell of fig leaves makes me think they must all be ripe. I can smell it across the yard.

Ron grafted four or five types of pecans on this tree which towers over me. I stood under it to take the photo of the top branches.
Whitey and Lily stopped to watch me coming across the pasture. Did you bring us an apple?
 New York Aster grows by the porch under the Crepe Myrtle tree.

 My red roses have become confused and are leafing out and budding trying to bloom again.

An old bird house hangs on the porch. See the spider web?
My old wicker rocker has had a hard and long life. Brenna’s dog stole my nice cushion.
 Zinnias are a favorite.

 Don’t you love how a weeping willow sweeps and sways in a breeze?
 Marigolds against a red wood fence. They are the perfect orange for fall.
New York Asters.
 A gulf Fritillary gathering nectar.
 I think this might be Blue Sage.
 This is Sneezeweed. It is well-named and grows in many pastures.
 Old barbed wire fences are strung  along on old stob posts. A soft yellow flower fills the whole pasture with bright yellow color. Sunflowers  and Jerusalem artichokes wave along roadsides and fences.

Flowers blooming just outside the garage.
 A basket hung out to dry.
 My white porch rocker.
 Wind chimes.
 Wood in the rack waiting for a night cold enough to build our first wood stove fire.
Salt Marsh Fleabane still  holds rounded mounds of purple flowers . Soon cold weather will set in and we will miss the green grass, the leafy shade trees and wildflowers. Goodbye summer. 

Walk on a Fall Day


I didn’t expect to find these roses blooming on an October day.

Ron hung this swing for me years ago. I wanted the children to enjoy a rope swing like the one my daddy made for me when I was a girl.

This slate was moved from the back forty and makes a nice roadway to the pasture where Brenna’s horses graze and butterflies flutter through the last flowers- asters and coreopsis.

The sky fills with billowing clouds in the hot afternoon. 
There is plenty of humidity evaporating from last night’s rainfall.

 The boy’s treehouse looks small now. The tree is a giant!
 I think this is Virginia Creeper with black berries. Who knows? isn’t it beautiful. It is hanging in heavy swags from the limbs of one of the oak trees out back.

 Asparagus with orange berries.
 Figs still not ripe. I have harvested a few and eaten them. They are so sweet when they ripen to a dark purplish brown. The smell of fig leaves makes me think they must all be ripe. I can smell it across the yard.

Ron grafted four or five types of pecans on this tree which towers over me. I stood under it to take the photo of the top branches.
Whitey and Lily stopped to watch me coming across the pasture. Did you bring us an apple?
 New York Aster grows by the porch under the Crepe Myrtle tree.

 My red roses have become confused and are leafing out and budding trying to bloom again.

An old bird house hangs on the porch. See the spider web?
My old wicker rocker has had a hard and long life. Brenna’s dog stole my nice cushion.
 Zinnias are a favorite.

 Don’t you love how a weeping willow sweeps and sways in a breeze?
 Marigolds against a red wood fence. They are the perfect orange for fall.
New York Asters.
 A gulf Fritillary gathering nectar.
 I think this might be Blue Sage.
 This is Sneezeweed. It is well-named and grows in many pastures.
 Old barbed wire fences are strung  along on old stob posts. A soft yellow flower fills the whole pasture with bright yellow color. Sunflowers  and Jerusalem artichokes wave along roadsides and fences.

Flowers blooming just outside the garage.
 A basket hung out to dry.
 My white porch rocker.
 Wind chimes.
 Wood in the rack waiting for a night cold enough to build our first wood stove fire.
Salt Marsh Fleabane still  holds rounded mounds of purple flowers . Soon cold weather will set in and we will miss the green grass, the leafy shade trees and wildflowers. Goodbye summer. 

Pianos and Ponies

Dear Jesus,

You certainly know how to make children happy.  A day or two ago, Brenna came riding up to the back porch  on her “borrowed” horse White-Tee. I took this picture of her docile steed and her joyful face. It reminded me of another little girl and an old piano.

You recall the piano, I’m sure. It was an old upright that had been in a little clapboard country church for decades. Its varnish was cracked and its keys were yellowed, but the tone and tune even after being moved in the back of a pickup truck were fine.

Rachel had wanted a piano since she could talk. She ached for one of her own. She asked us again and again, but at that time we really couldn’t afford to consider it. When your daughter wants something so badly it is painful to say no.  We told her that there was no way we could buy her dream for her, at least for a few years. We told her to pray and tell you  about her wish. That night she prayed for you to send her a piano.

She must have had great faith because the next afternoon the phone rang. It was Rachel’s Grandma. Her church was purchasing a new piano and had to move the old one. She wondered if Rachel still wanted one. If we would come pick it up within a week, she could have it. We did, of course, and that old piano was a thrill to Rachel. She learned to play on it. When she was teenager she was able to buy a better instrument. But that first one was her own personal miracle and her faith and talents grew.

Brenna wanted a horse to ride. This beautiful and calm horse is her personal miracle. She keeps him and rides and trains him, but for now he belongs to a neighbor. The neighbor even provided a saddle and tack and a request that she keep the horse in our pasture and ride him often.

Jesus, you are good to bless us with such things. You show us that you know our needs and our hearts’ desires and that you care, even about dreams like pianos and ponies.

Love you,
Elece

Pianos and Ponies

Dear Jesus,

You certainly know how to make children happy.  A day or two ago, Brenna came riding up to the back porch  on her “borrowed” horse White-Tee. I took this picture of her docile steed and her joyful face. It reminded me of another little girl and an old piano.

You recall the piano, I’m sure. It was an old upright that had been in a little clapboard country church for decades. Its varnish was cracked and its keys were yellowed, but the tone and tune even after being moved in the back of a pickup truck were fine.

Rachel had wanted a piano since she could talk. She ached for one of her own. She asked us again and again, but at that time we really couldn’t afford to consider it. When your daughter wants something so badly it is painful to say no.  We told her that there was no way we could buy her dream for her, at least for a few years. We told her to pray and tell you  about her wish. That night she prayed for you to send her a piano.

She must have had great faith because the next afternoon the phone rang. It was Rachel’s Grandma. Her church was purchasing a new piano and had to move the old one. She wondered if Rachel still wanted one. If we would come pick it up within a week, she could have it. We did, of course, and that old piano was a thrill to Rachel. She learned to play on it. When she was teenager she was able to buy a better instrument. But that first one was her own personal miracle and her faith and talents grew.

Brenna wanted a horse to ride. This beautiful and calm horse is her personal miracle. She keeps him and rides and trains him, but for now he belongs to a neighbor. The neighbor even provided a saddle and tack and a request that she keep the horse in our pasture and ride him often.

Jesus, you are good to bless us with such things. You show us that you know our needs and our hearts’ desires and that you care, even about dreams like pianos and ponies.

Love you,
Elece

Pecan Growers Convention

Ron, Brenna, and I attended the pecan Growers Convention in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Ardmore is south of Paul’s Valley and Turner Falls where our teens went to Bible Camp last week. After church at Faith Baptist in Broken Arrow, we visited with Jordyn, her mom, and brother Kaiden, and Rose and Larry who came by to wish Ron a happy Father’s Day. Jordyn and Grandpa are working up a comedy skit or something. I tell you, Father’s Day can be stressful!

It was a long drive and the Oklahoma sky was clear of all but some puffy white clouds. We ate at the Prairie Kitchen and stayed at the Marriott Hotel next door to the Ardmore Convention Center. Red Crepe Myrtle bushes were planted around the hotel grounds. We explored around town and saw these cool horses sculpted from scrap metal.

The Ardmore Convention Center is new. It is a fun building, very artsy.
The American Bison was painted with a train and deot, oil derrick, and an Indian.
 
The design is art from the ceiling, to windows, to the doors, ticket booth, and the carpets.

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!
I won prizes in the pecan food show for Pecan Cherry bread and Pecan Praline Cake.

Pecan Growers Convention

Ron, Brenna, and I attended the pecan Growers Convention in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Ardmore is south of Paul’s Valley and Turner Falls where our teens went to Bible Camp last week. After church at Faith Baptist in Broken Arrow, we visited with Jordyn, her mom, and brother Kaiden, and Rose and Larry who came by to wish Ron a happy Father’s Day. Jordyn and Grandpa are working up a comedy skit or something. I tell you, Father’s Day can be stressful!

It was a long drive and the Oklahoma sky was clear of all but some puffy white clouds. We ate at the Prairie Kitchen and stayed at the Marriott Hotel next door to the Ardmore Convention Center. Red Crepe Myrtle bushes were planted around the hotel grounds. We explored around town and saw these cool horses sculpted from scrap metal.

The Ardmore Convention Center is new. It is a fun building, very artsy.
The American Bison was painted with a train and deot, oil derrick, and an Indian.
 
The design is art from the ceiling, to windows, to the doors, ticket booth, and the carpets.

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!
I won prizes in the pecan food show for Pecan Cherry bread and Pecan Praline Cake.

Impressions of an Old Farm

The old farm house and detached garage and shed used to be painted yellow. Maybe this horse stable was once used as a chicken coop? I wondered about this window. What’s the point?

The horses still like the shed.
The old sink turned watering trough was mighty dry. The horses must have another water source.
Another dry sink trough.
Old wood fence posts and chain, barb wire and other fencing types.
An old can. Note the tree sprouting from the trunk.
Lilies in a flowerbed beside the old house.
Pasture grasses.

Old gas can by a barbed wire fence.
Pasture roses along a fence out back.
An old storm cellar, Wizard of Oz style. The door lifts up to one side 
and the main room has two covered air ports.
Dark, wet with sticks, roots, and old glass jars. I wouldn’t want to have to shelter here.
Ivy overtakes the old garage’s back. The tree trunks are 
covered too.