My Fairy Garden

 I heard fairy gardens are very popular this year. “What’s a fairy garden,” I asked?
 They are, or so I hear,
 large container gardens decorated with tiny lawn furniture and trinkets, small plants and vines,
 As a place where the tiny creatures might like to hang out on summer nights. Being an essentially hospitable person, I decided to make a fairy garden for my porch.
I chose an abandoned bird’s nest as a more natural bed for a fairy .
  I gathered some plants with tiny blooms and leaves and some stuff that fairies might like furniture wise or as lawn ornaments, like sea shells, polished stones, and beach glass.
 A miniature fern
 A tinsy variegated ivy
If the rumor is true, fairies will come at night and lounge around in my fairy garden
 and leave me gifts like gold coins, fifty-cent pieces, and other treats.
 I planted a white moon vine that blooms only in the dark of night 
and gives off a sickly-sweet scent to draw special moths. 
I think the fairies will be awestruck!

My Fairy Garden

 I heard fairy gardens are very popular this year. “What’s a fairy garden,” I asked?
 They are, or so I hear,
 large container gardens decorated with tiny lawn furniture and trinkets, small plants and vines,
 As a place where the tiny creatures might like to hang out on summer nights. Being an essentially hospitable person, I decided to make a fairy garden for my porch.
I chose an abandoned bird’s nest as a more natural bed for a fairy .
  I gathered some plants with tiny blooms and leaves and some stuff that fairies might like furniture wise or as lawn ornaments, like sea shells, polished stones, and beach glass.
 A miniature fern
 A tinsy variegated ivy
If the rumor is true, fairies will come at night and lounge around in my fairy garden
 and leave me gifts like gold coins, fifty-cent pieces, and other treats.
 I planted a white moon vine that blooms only in the dark of night 
and gives off a sickly-sweet scent to draw special moths. 
I think the fairies will be awestruck!

Dear Carpenter,
Have you ever wondered what happened to your old tool box? Probably, you left it in the detached garage beside the first house you rented forty-five years ago.I wish I could ask if you made the box yourself and if it was always painted sage green.

You might be irked to know that I bought the odd antique at a garage sale for two dollars. The straight rod that formed the handle and fit in the holes at each end was broken and held in place with masking tape. I tried to fix it, but gave up and removed the handle altogether.

The lids were still hinged in place, so I folded them open before I filled the base with broken pottery pieces and covered those with potting soil. I filled it with purple petunias which have bloomed happily where once screw drivers, hammers, a hand drill, chisels, sand paper, and nails mingled.

I know you haven’t forgotten this tool box. Surely, you set it aside with a bit of nostalgia when you purchased your first metal one to replace it. Maybe, you thought your grandchildren would like to see it someday. So you set it on the garage shelf where it collected up rolls of fishing line, random extra tools, and a 3-in-1 oil can. A mud dauber built a stucco apartment on the underside of the lid and it was forgotten.

Years later, someone cleaned junk from the garage and took it with a load of salvageables to the sale, where I saw it and invested two bucks in my love of the mysterious. Every antique has a story and a mystery. I can resist neither. So, I thank you for the fun and though you may be miffed at my turning your manly toolbox into a flower planter, you have to admit, it does a beautiful service.

Still Friends?
Elece

Dear Carpenter,
Have you ever wondered what happened to your old tool box? Probably, you left it in the detached garage beside the first house you rented forty-five years ago.I wish I could ask if you made the box yourself and if it was always painted sage green.

You might be irked to know that I bought the odd antique at a garage sale for two dollars. The straight rod that formed the handle and fit in the holes at each end was broken and held in place with masking tape. I tried to fix it, but gave up and removed the handle altogether.

The lids were still hinged in place, so I folded them open before I filled the base with broken pottery pieces and covered those with potting soil. I filled it with purple petunias which have bloomed happily where once screw drivers, hammers, a hand drill, chisels, sand paper, and nails mingled.

I know you haven’t forgotten this tool box. Surely, you set it aside with a bit of nostalgia when you purchased your first metal one to replace it. Maybe, you thought your grandchildren would like to see it someday. So you set it on the garage shelf where it collected up rolls of fishing line, random extra tools, and a 3-in-1 oil can. A mud dauber built a stucco apartment on the underside of the lid and it was forgotten.

Years later, someone cleaned junk from the garage and took it with a load of salvageables to the sale, where I saw it and invested two bucks in my love of the mysterious. Every antique has a story and a mystery. I can resist neither. So, I thank you for the fun and though you may be miffed at my turning your manly toolbox into a flower planter, you have to admit, it does a beautiful service.

Still Friends?
Elece