Master of Artistry Totally Tuesday

The extravagant gesture is the very stuff of creation. 
Annie Dillard


Master of Artistry

I relished bright costumes full of patent pizzazz
Skirts and dresses of sparkling jazz
Wonderful, fantastic, delightful array
The sweetest conceptions of  a “dizzy-land” day.

However so darling, creative, and bright
Still cannot compare to the crafter of light
Who amazes us daily with gorgeous designs,
The face of the earth he loads and he lines

With figures, with shapes, with styles that delight us
Astound us, amaze us, amuse us—treat us
To glorious creations of plants and bright flowers
Which show in their beauty his marvelous powers,

His penchant for color is stirred into the picture
His fine sense of humor and a splash of adventure
No man holds a candle to what He can make
When the master of artistry shocks us awake.

©2014 Elece Hollis, author of Limitless Grace,  available  at Mardel’s or on Amazon http://amzn.to/1uEcfUM

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My Fairy Garden

 I heard fairy gardens are very popular this year. “What’s a fairy garden,” I asked?
 They are, or so I hear,
 large container gardens decorated with tiny lawn furniture and trinkets, small plants and vines,
 As a place where the tiny creatures might like to hang out on summer nights. Being an essentially hospitable person, I decided to make a fairy garden for my porch.
I chose an abandoned bird’s nest as a more natural bed for a fairy .
  I gathered some plants with tiny blooms and leaves and some stuff that fairies might like furniture wise or as lawn ornaments, like sea shells, polished stones, and beach glass.
 A miniature fern
 A tinsy variegated ivy
If the rumor is true, fairies will come at night and lounge around in my fairy garden
 and leave me gifts like gold coins, fifty-cent pieces, and other treats.
 I planted a white moon vine that blooms only in the dark of night 
and gives off a sickly-sweet scent to draw special moths. 
I think the fairies will be awestruck!

My Fairy Garden

 I heard fairy gardens are very popular this year. “What’s a fairy garden,” I asked?
 They are, or so I hear,
 large container gardens decorated with tiny lawn furniture and trinkets, small plants and vines,
 As a place where the tiny creatures might like to hang out on summer nights. Being an essentially hospitable person, I decided to make a fairy garden for my porch.
I chose an abandoned bird’s nest as a more natural bed for a fairy .
  I gathered some plants with tiny blooms and leaves and some stuff that fairies might like furniture wise or as lawn ornaments, like sea shells, polished stones, and beach glass.
 A miniature fern
 A tinsy variegated ivy
If the rumor is true, fairies will come at night and lounge around in my fairy garden
 and leave me gifts like gold coins, fifty-cent pieces, and other treats.
 I planted a white moon vine that blooms only in the dark of night 
and gives off a sickly-sweet scent to draw special moths. 
I think the fairies will be awestruck!

Cone Flowers

The Gray-headed Coneflower is a mid-summer field flower with a large seed head and thirteen petals that hang down nearly touching the stem. Only one bloom per stem.

Can you see a little black and yellow butterfly on one bloom? Notice the caterpillar shaped tufts on the grass stems around the flowers.
Notice how after the petals fall the seed head stays intact on the stem until it has dried sufficiently. Birds eat the seeds and the wind scatters the rest away to reseed themselves across the parcel of prairie.
 
The heavy seed heads and the thin stems cause many of the flowers to overturn and hang upside down like dancers in a yellow skirts taking bows at the end of a performance. 

Cone Flowers

The Gray-headed Coneflower is a mid-summer field flower with a large seed head and thirteen petals that hang down nearly touching the stem. Only one bloom per stem.
Can you see a little black and yellow butterfly on one bloom? Notice the caterpillar shaped tufts on the grass stems around the flowers.
Notice how after the petals fall the seed head stays intact on the stem until it has dried sufficiently. Birds eat the seeds and the wind scatters the rest away to reseed themselves across the parcel of prairie.
 
The heavy seed heads and the thin stems cause many of the flowers to overturn and hang upside down like dancers in a yellow skirts taking bows at the end of a performance.