Pie Pumpkins aren’t always Orange

fullsizeoutput_7ad1This pretty white pumpkin isn’t orange at all, but will make at least 4 fine orange pumpkin pies! I never knew there were other colors of pumpkins until a few years ago. Pumpkins come in all shades of orange and tan, and even white, gray, blue, and purple. Yet most are orange meated.

The pumpkins we grew up seeing were round and bright primary orange. The rounded orange ones usually for sale around Halloween are thin-walled and easier to carve so they are just right for the season. The squatty tan pumpkins have thicker meat and are good for pie baking. I have tried all colors even the blues.

I like a pie made from the fresh pumpkin instead of the canned pumpkin. Why not try it?

Pumpkin Pie

Plan for two pies. Make two crusts and place those into pie plates and crimp the edges.

Crust recipe: 2 cups flour, 3/4 cup of lard, shortening or butter. 1/4 teaspoon salt. Cut the shortening or butter into the flour until crumbly. Add 7 tablespoons of ice water. Stir into a ball. Knead until mixed well then divide in two balls and roll out.

Cut up and clear the seeds and strings from inside your pumpkin and place it in a stock pot over boiling water to steam for about 30 minutes. Then cut out the soft pulp. You will need three cups for two pies.  Add the cooled pumpkin pulp to 2 cups of sugar and 4 egg yolks and 2 cups milk. Mix together. Add spices: 2 teaspoons of cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon cloves, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Beat the egg whites until fluffy and then fold them into the pumpkin mixture. Pour into the two pie crusts and place in preheated oven (350 degrees) for 40 minutes.

This makes a wonderful couple of from-scratch pumpkin pies with a nice custard and flavor. Freeze one for later. Serve with whipped cream.

 

An Old Cellar

I passed this cellar at an old homesite many times before I noticed it. It is on a corner of an acreage, where the main paved road is intersected by a gravel road. The roof is concreted and arched. The front and back walls are bricked, as are the stair guards and the chimney.

Large trees have grown so close that they have probably intruded and caused the cellar to leak. In that case, it is likely to be half filled with murky water. I couldn’t investigate the inside because of a fence around the property.

I think it was a tornado shelter, (the old timer’s called it a fraidy-hole), but it probably served also as a cool place to store fruits and vegetables. There was no door, but maybe never was one. From the side, you can see how low the roof really is; and you get a view of the chimney on the back, added to assure plenty of oxygen.

I’ve heard that this spot was once the site of a small rural community called Pumpkin Center. A country store and early gas station, and a house or two were situated there where now only cattle graze in the hot sun.

An Old Cellar

I passed this cellar at an old homesite many times before I noticed it. It is on a corner of an acreage, where the main paved road is intersected by a gravel road. The roof is concreted and arched. The front and back walls are bricked, as are the stair guards and the chimney.

Large trees have grown so close that they have probably intruded and caused the cellar to leak. In that case, it is likely to be half filled with murky water. I couldn’t investigate the inside because of a fence around the property.

I think it was a tornado shelter, (the old timer’s called it a fraidy-hole), but it probably served also as a cool place to store fruits and vegetables. There was no door, but maybe never was one. From the side, you can see how low the roof really is; and you get a view of the chimney on the back, added to assure plenty of oxygen.

I’ve heard that this spot was once the site of a small rural community called Pumpkin Center. A country store and early gas station, and a house or two were situated there where now only cattle graze in the hot sun.