Pecan Growers Convention

Ron, Brenna, and I attended the pecan Growers Convention in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Ardmore is south of Paul’s Valley and Turner Falls where our teens went to Bible Camp last week. After church at Faith Baptist in Broken Arrow, we visited with Jordyn, her mom, and brother Kaiden, and Rose and Larry who came by to wish Ron a happy Father’s Day. Jordyn and Grandpa are working up a comedy skit or something. I tell you, Father’s Day can be stressful!

It was a long drive and the Oklahoma sky was clear of all but some puffy white clouds. We ate at the Prairie Kitchen and stayed at the Marriott Hotel next door to the Ardmore Convention Center. Red Crepe Myrtle bushes were planted around the hotel grounds. We explored around town and saw these cool horses sculpted from scrap metal.

The Ardmore Convention Center is new. It is a fun building, very artsy.
The American Bison was painted with a train and deot, oil derrick, and an Indian.
 
The design is art from the ceiling, to windows, to the doors, ticket booth, and the carpets.

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!
I won prizes in the pecan food show for Pecan Cherry bread and Pecan Praline Cake.

Pecan Growers Convention

Ron, Brenna, and I attended the pecan Growers Convention in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Ardmore is south of Paul’s Valley and Turner Falls where our teens went to Bible Camp last week. After church at Faith Baptist in Broken Arrow, we visited with Jordyn, her mom, and brother Kaiden, and Rose and Larry who came by to wish Ron a happy Father’s Day. Jordyn and Grandpa are working up a comedy skit or something. I tell you, Father’s Day can be stressful!

It was a long drive and the Oklahoma sky was clear of all but some puffy white clouds. We ate at the Prairie Kitchen and stayed at the Marriott Hotel next door to the Ardmore Convention Center. Red Crepe Myrtle bushes were planted around the hotel grounds. We explored around town and saw these cool horses sculpted from scrap metal.

The Ardmore Convention Center is new. It is a fun building, very artsy.
The American Bison was painted with a train and deot, oil derrick, and an Indian.
 
The design is art from the ceiling, to windows, to the doors, ticket booth, and the carpets.

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!

The convention show floor featured booths of pecan products and orchard machinery, tools and information. There were workshops on interesting topics like controlling tree aphids and leaf scab, grafting and pruning, storing pecans, health issues, pecan research, and markets. There were also competitions by orchards for the best pecan varieties and crops. A pecan farmer in Muskogee took three of the top awards!
I won prizes in the pecan food show for Pecan Cherry bread and Pecan Praline Cake.

Oklahoma Pastureland

One of my favorite sights in spring is an Oklahoma pasture with grazing cows or horses, many with their calfs and colts beside them. I love the white clouds dancing across an everchanging blue skyscape. Pasture trees seem to turn green overnight. Barbed wire and rose briar fence in dry grasses beginning to show green from underneath. Often a hawk ornaments a fence post or a meadowlark puffs its black and yellow chest at the world and sings to the day from its wire perch.

He sings for sheer joy. Spring has come! He inspires the whole prairie with his song. From the creek banks treefrogs sing too, a chorus that intensifies when there is rain. Life stirs in the grasses. Birds build nests and rabbits give birth inside shallow burrows.

Hawks soar overhead on these afternoons – screeching at the world – a defiant – “I’ll get you” sound. Wind sweeps the whole picture, stirring the treetops and drawing the sap out to the waiting buds. The sap will feed the new leaves and make them hardy. Soon the fences will be punctuated with sprays of pink wild roses and honeysuckle.

Soon heat will come as the sun rises and heats the ground with penetrating light. Humid and eighty-five by nine in the morning; breathless and one hundred degrees by noon, the days will live long and ride slow. Lanquishing in the heat, cows will wade into the warm pond water. Dragonflies will zip and buzz like tiny helicopters across the cows broad backs.

Wildflowers and blackberries will bloom and bare fruit there. Clouds will build toward evening and thunderstorms and tornados lurk always near. The everlasting winds weary the earth.

That’s summer in Oklahoma. I can feel it coming!

Oklahoma Pastureland

One of my favorite sights in spring is an Oklahoma pasture with grazing cows or horses, many with their calfs and colts beside them. I love the white clouds dancing across an everchanging blue skyscape. Pasture trees seem to turn green overnight. Barbed wire and rose briar fence in dry grasses beginning to show green from underneath. Often a hawk ornaments a fence post or a meadowlark puffs its black and yellow chest at the world and sings to the day from its wire perch.

He sings for sheer joy. Spring has come! He inspires the whole prairie with his song. From the creek banks treefrogs sing too, a chorus that intensifies when there is rain. Life stirs in the grasses. Birds build nests and rabbits give birth inside shallow burrows.

Hawks soar overhead on these afternoons – screeching at the world – a defiant – “I’ll get you” sound. Wind sweeps the whole picture, stirring the treetops and drawing the sap out to the waiting buds. The sap will feed the new leaves and make them hardy. Soon the fences will be punctuated with sprays of pink wild roses and honeysuckle.

Soon heat will come as the sun rises and heats the ground with penetrating light. Humid and eighty-five by nine in the morning; breathless and one hundred degrees by noon, the days will live long and ride slow. Lanquishing in the heat, cows will wade into the warm pond water. Dragonflies will zip and buzz like tiny helicopters across the cows broad backs.

Wildflowers and blackberries will bloom and bare fruit there. Clouds will build toward evening and thunderstorms and tornados lurk always near. The everlasting winds weary the earth.

That’s summer in Oklahoma. I can feel it coming!

A Snow Job

           The world turned white on Christmas Eve when a blizzard hit Oklahoma. We woke Christmas morning to a few inches of white laid like a blanket over the farm. Everything brown and dead was covered with clean, bright snow that made the farm into a pristine wonderland.

Noone went out, except to the barn to give some feed and hay to the cows, horses, and donkeys, and to break the ice in the water trough. The lanscape was treacherous because of a layer of ice under the snow. It was beautiful though. All the farm junk was hidden. You know the old car, the two broken down mowers and the derelict tractor.

All the large family mess was hidden– the new puppy’s trail of chewed up destruction, the bike a grandson left lying, the remains of the brush pile burn, the lawn chairs, the pothole on the driveway, neon yellow water hose, the flower pots that the wind blew from the porch, etc. The brown grass, the dead weeds, the leafless  shrubs–covered.

Have you ever been snowed? Ever pulled a “snow job?” I remember when my oldest daughter Del was an adolescent , she tried one on me. Her bedroom was a fright and I drew my line in the sandwich. Until the room was clean, she would get no food–no lunch; and if it took her too long, no supper.  Well, Del slouched to her room and sprinted out just a few minutes later. I went toinspect never expecting to find under her bed a clean floor. I opened the closet not expectingto find clothes hung neatly , shoes lined up on the floor and a row of brown packages on the shelf overhead. The shelf held brown grocery bags neatly  lined up. I pulled one down

Winter Weather

The wind howled at us all night. It was like a wild animal outside but it couldn’t get inside. It was scary in an exciting way, reminding me of some of the blizzards I experienced as a child. It is very cold, but we had only a flurry of new snow and  a little cold rain. 

I had been thinking of the homeless people who were featured in the Tulsa newspaper. The mission was taking in many more than capacity because of the extreme weather. It is so sad to me that these people have no place even a small shed or tiny, poor apartment. They huddle behind buildings, in parks under shrubs, and under bridges. Such a life!

I lay in my nice comfortable bed all snuggled under the blankets and listened to the howl of the wind. It was frightful and at the same time delicious for drama.

God has been so good to us. I don’t have to fear that my family will be cold. We have warm coats, hats, a good, if old, house with storm windows, central heat and a woodstove in the family room. We have electricity and clean water, plenty of food, and really more than we need. I still catch myself whining sometimes though. Shame on me.

The wind was high and drove away all the clouds my morning, so it is sunny today. I supposed that with such wind the seven bird feeders I filled yesterday would be emptied, yet there was still seed in them. Firewood is stacked by the stove and more on the porch.

The wind has worried at us and is blowing still. It is very cold, supposed to get down below zero during the night. Thank you, Lord  for the blessings of home.