Let There Still Be Roses

 Dear Jesus,

 I read in Isaiah 55 these words:
 “So you will go out with joy, 
and be led forth in peace. 
The mountains and the hills will burst into singing before you 
and all the trees of the fields will clap their hands.
Large cypress trees will grow where thornbushes were.
 Myrtle trees will grow where weeds were.
 These things will be a reminder of the Lord’s promise,
and this reminder will never be destroyed.”

 I love roses on their thorny bushes. 
I love roses and can’t think that heaven on earth could lack them.
 Oh, Jesus…….
Oh, please, Lord say there will still be roses!

Let There Still Be Roses

 Dear Jesus,

 I read in Isaiah 55 these words:
 “So you will go out with joy, 
and be led forth in peace. 
The mountains and the hills will burst into singing before you 
and all the trees of the fields will clap their hands.
Large cypress trees will grow where thornbushes were.
 Myrtle trees will grow where weeds were.
 These things will be a reminder of the Lord’s promise,
and this reminder will never be destroyed.”

 I love roses on their thorny bushes. 
I love roses and can’t think that heaven on earth could lack them.
 Oh, Jesus…….
Oh, please, Lord say there will still be roses!

Buildings Reclaimed by the Prairie

An old hotel built of stone, old schools, roadside motel and a rock house abandoned to undergrowth are reclaimed eventually by the prairie that mothered them.

Have you driven past this old hotel in Muskogee? I’ll bet you have. It was last used as a hunting supply store and is located on highway 16 which enters Muskogee from the West and is named Okmulgee Street.

This was the front office. It is overgrown with vines, signs are gone and windows are missing. The rear cabins each stood separate and housed one traveling family.

The cabins are constructed of flat native stones as are many park cabins and shelters that were built by the W.P.A. in the dust bowl days of the Great Depression.

The arch above each “cabin” was outlined with bricks, possibly bricks from the Boynton Brick Factory. Now the property is abandoned and the prairie has reasserted itself in every crack and crevice. Shrubs and grass and weeds and trees are breaking up concrete and stone work.

Time and weather have rotted doors and window frames. Animals have found shelter along with hobos and vagabonds. Neighborhood children may have played here and teens lingered in the forsaken roadside rooms.

At night I imagine owls haunt the spaces.

What was this place like in 1950? I imagine an old car parked at one of the cabins, a father carrying a box of food and some luggage to the door. A child is playing in the grassy area out behind the motel. A mother seated in a old wooden chair nursing her baby in the welcome shade of a Osage Orange tree.

God has erased the scene with time and change and covered it with vines and branches, grass and wildflowers. I heard birds singing overhead, cicadas thrumming their afternoon songs, and wind like ghosts moving in the shadowy places making leaves shiver.The prairie wins!

Buildings Reclaimed by the Prairie

An old hotel built of stone, old schools, roadside motel and a rock house abandoned to undergrowth are reclaimed eventually by the prairie that mothered them.

Have you driven past this old hotel in Muskogee? I’ll bet you have. It was last used as a hunting supply store and is located on highway 16 which enters Muskogee from the West and is named Okmulgee Street.

This was the front office. It is overgrown with vines, signs are gone and windows are missing. The rear cabins each stood separate and housed one traveling family.

The cabins are constructed of flat native stones as are many park cabins and shelters that were built by the W.P.A. in the dust bowl days of the Great Depression.

The arch above each “cabin” was outlined with bricks, possibly bricks from the Boynton Brick Factory. Now the property is abandoned and the prairie has reasserted itself in every crack and crevice. Shrubs and grass and weeds and trees are breaking up concrete and stone work.

Time and weather have rotted doors and window frames. Animals have found shelter along with hobos and vagabonds. Neighborhood children may have played here and teens lingered in the forsaken roadside rooms.

At night I imagine owls haunt the spaces.

What was this place like in 1950? I imagine an old car parked at one of the cabins, a father carrying a box of food and some luggage to the door. A child is playing in the grassy area out behind the motel. A mother seated in a old wooden chair nursing her baby in the welcome shade of a Osage Orange tree.

God has erased the scene with time and change and covered it with vines and branches, grass and wildflowers. I heard birds singing overhead, cicadas thrumming their afternoon songs, and wind like ghosts moving in the shadowy places making leaves shiver.The prairie wins!

Creekside Cottage, Joplin

This weekend we celebrated our thirty-seventh anniversary with a trip to Missouri. We stayed at the Creekside Cottages, a bed and breakfast recommended to us by my sister Rebecca.

 It was a rustic and comfortable and peaceful place to stay. We enjoyed the creek from a porch that ran along the back and one side of the cabin. Trees grew through the porch and shaded it. You could fish from the porch.

We enjoyed the hammock, but it was hot out in the sun and I noticed how precarious the hammock was on the edge of the embankment and with some healthy poison ivy down  below.

Acorn cups showed us that squirrels were busy feasting in the oak trees. Wind blew hickory nuts loose and they smacked the roof and rolled “snickety-snackety”down and landed with a “plunk” in the creek.

Creekside Cottage, Joplin

This weekend we celebrated our thirty-seventh anniversary with a trip to Missouri. We stayed at the Creekside Cottages, a bed and breakfast recommended to us by my sister Rebecca.

 It was a rustic and comfortable and peaceful place to stay. We enjoyed the creek from a porch that ran along the back and one side of the cabin. Trees grew through the porch and shaded it. You could fish from the porch.

We enjoyed the hammock, but it was hot out in the sun and I noticed how precarious the hammock was on the edge of the embankment and with some healthy poison ivy down  below.

Acorn cups showed us that squirrels were busy feasting in the oak trees. Wind blew hickory nuts loose and they smacked the roof and rolled “snickety-snackety”down and landed with a “plunk” in the creek.

Catalpa Tree of the Prairie

Like clusters of tiny pale orchids the catalpa trees bloom gloriously every May. These trees can be spotted from a distance like tall ladies in pale green ball gowns embellished with white pearls.
Covered with blooms, a row of these trees along a street is like a lineup 
of models in a bridal fashion show.
      Except each dress is alike! 
 
 
The blossoms are lacy and soft, shaped like orchids, each with a patches of dark rust red dots in lines, and spangled with a curl of golden pollen. The flowers pop a few at a time from their round red buds. After a spring shower or a windy day the blooms cover the ground under the trees like a knobby white rag rug.
 
Later, the tree’s exceptional leaves, the size of offering plates, provide full and welcome shade from Oklahoma summer’s heat. All summer, green bean pods grow and fill out with seeds until they are one and a half to two feet long. A colorful caterpillar feasts on the trees fuzzy broad leaves. 
These are great for fishing I have heard.