Spring Comes Softly

“Spring comes so softly that we don’t hear her voice until we have seen her wave her green. Suddenly there is color and music and our hearts fill with each note.”

c.e. hollis

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Spring Comes Softly

The daffodils, crocuses, and hyacinths are first to show up. They are “sudden” clumps of green stems and among them are hidden swellings that become the harbingers of spring––wonderful spring. Who is not waiting for her, watching for her, ready for her warmer days?

The iris fronds are shapely and green. They seem to appear like miracles though we know they are coming. We thought we were watching. We are always certain we’ll spot them––then suddenly they are there. How did that happen?

The trees begin with tiny pale green leafs that burst from buds we didn’t notice. They soon cover the limbs, branches, and every twig that survived the winter’s cold. Some dance in white or pink dresses of blossoms. Some have flowers as green as the new leaves themselves.

The grass shows up in funny patches and then is all of a sudden it is a sight that makes the boy who mows all summer sigh and wish his dad would buy a riding mower. Soon there will be enough grass and clover to blind you with green. Like an explosion––spring has begun.

Tree frogs begin their choruses along the creek bank. New calves romp in the pasture, and birds build nests. The days, still shorter than summer, begin to lengthen and hearts begin to feel the season’s hope.

♥♥♥♥

Teaching kindergarten and the elementary grades was a delight to me. I enjoyed the days of watching little persons grow and begin their educations.

Elementary students are fragile and wonderfully teachable. I wanted to do the best with my students, so for me it was a season of prayer and a season of joy––SPRING!

I wrote these prayers and matched them to the sights and sounds of springtime and to scriptures from Psalms that touched my heart.

The Heart of Spring––Prayers for Teachers

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Published by Elece

I am a photographer and a freelance writer. I write stories, poetry, gift books, and magazine articles––both print and online. Photographing children, places, and especially flowers is my hobby.

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